Intergroup Relations

The Program on Intergroup Relations (IGR) is a social justice education program. IGR blends theory and experiential learning to facilitate students' learning about social group identity, social inequality, and intergroup relations. The program prepares students to live and work in a diverse world and educates them in making choices that advance equity, justice, and peace. IGR was founded in 1988 and was the first program of its kind. IGR is a partnership between Student Life and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. 

Mission Statement

To pursue social justice through education.

Vision
Through engaged learning, research, and leadership opportunities, IGR's vision is to educate students on social justice and intergroup relations, to prepare them to lead others in creating a more inclusive campus and world.

Core Work

Courses

IGR offers seven different courses that are designed for students with special interests in social diversity and social justice. The courses utilize experiential pedagogy to analyze and understand social conflict, intergroup relations and issues of diversity and justice. Within these, students who follow a specified course sequence, along with certain other requirements, earn the Patricia Gurin Certificate of Merit in Intergroup Relations.

CommonGround

The CommonGround Workshop Program was developed for students to learn about social inequalities and social justice in a workshop format. Student organizations, classes, and other campus communities can request workshops on topics that increase awareness of issues of identity, diversity, and intergroup relations.

Community Outreach

The Youth Dialogues on Race and Ethnicity program increases dialogue among high-school aged youth in schools across metropolitan Detroit. Young people of African, Asian, European, Latino and Latina, and Middle Eastern descent participate in structured dialogues and other programs that challenge discrimination and create change.

National Institute on Intergroup Dialogue

The institute is for other institutions who wish to learn “The Michigan Model” of Intergroup Dialogue philosophy and techniques for the purpose of creating dialogue programs on their own campuses. Since 2006, IGR has hosted over 120 institutions.

Research

IGR conducts research to assess program outcomes and aims to answer questions about what students gain from intergroup dialogue participation and how the pedagogy influences these outcomes. Using various methodologies, researchers mentor undergraduates and graduate students. Together, they have published journal articles (including peer-reviewed), monographs, essays, book chapters, books, and doctoral dissertations on intergroup dialogue research.

 

IGR Students Tell You What IGR Is and Why Get Involved!

The Program on Intergroup Relations would like to thank the students on IGR's recruitment team for creating this video to share the benefits and transferable skills they've gained from their involvement in the program!

Jonathan Lee, Javonne Barrett, and Corine Rosenberg of IGR's Student Recruitment Team

Meet the IGR Advisory Committee

We are pleased to share the names of the IGR Advisory Committee with you. The committee meets yearly to discuss the growth and direction of IGR, as well as discuss issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts on campus.

For more information about any of the individuals listed, simply click their name(s). If you have any questions about the committee, please email IGR.info(at)umich.edu for further information. 

Alford A. Young

IGR Logo Image

IGR Student Engagement Team Continues to Bring IGR Community Together

This semester, the Student Engagement Team focused on opening up the physical IGR space to more students on campus. With the CommonGround programming team, we coordinated ​three different open dialogues, one revolving around gun safety, one about cultural appropriation in Halloween costumes, and one about anti-blackness and the events at the University of Missouri. We arranged these dialogues so that they would be topical - hosting each either before or after a major event relating to the dialogue's topic.

Photo of Elena Ross and Gloriela Iguin-Colon, IGR SET Team Coordinators

Off The Cuff: Food and Identity

October 2015

In this ongoing feature, we ask IGR students and alumni each month for their opinion on a fun question that relates to issues that are discussed within IGR's courses and co-curricular activities.This month's question is: "We don't always think about how food can be very connected to identity, and interactions amongst different identities. What identity issues do you see unfolding around the different foods students on campus eat and the reasons behind what they eat?

 


A Letter From The Directors (October 2015)

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

We hope this newsletter finds you well and enjoying the autumn weather! As always, we in IGR are greatly enjoying the Fall term and all the new excitement and energy the students bring to it. This term, we are excited to be offering our intergroup dialogue course to 117 students.

Photo of Monita Thompson and Kelly Maxwell

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