Intergroup Relations

IGR course descriptions are updated mid-semester prior to each subsequent semester. Courses for the Fall semester are updated by the mid-Winter semester. 

*Counts toward the Patricia Gurin Certificate of Merit in Intergroup Relations award

 

ALA/PSYCH/SOC 122: Intergroup Dialogues (2 credits)*

Offered during Fall/Winter

(In-person)

In Intergroup Dialogues, students will participate in semi-structured face-to-face meetings across different social identity groups led by peer facilitators. Though topics will vary by semester, topics may include race, gender, sexual orientation, and socio-economic status. Through readings, in-class exercises with thoughtful debriefs, and participant journals and other assignments, students will explore their own identities, build relationships across different identities and learn about pertinent issues facing various social identity groups on campus and in society.  This course creates a setting in which students engage in open and constructive dialogue, learn about themselves and others, and explore issues concerning intergroup relations, conflict, and social justice. Ultimately, the goal of this class is for students to develop greater intergroup empathy, develop skills to collaborate across difference, and tools to participate in social change. We encourage students who successfully participate in this class to consider taking our training and practicum courses and minoring in IGR. 

The textbook, "Introduction to Intergroup Dialogues: First Edition" edited by Stephanie Hicks, is required for the course and can be purchased online. More purchase information will be included in the course syllabus.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to The Program on Intergroup Relations, 734-615-1458, igrcourses@umich.edu.

Course Requirement: To receive departmental permission, students must complete the placement survey by visiting: https://webapps.lsa.umich.edu/igr/Dialogue.aspx

Intended Audience: For students who can attend during the scheduled class time to participate in class discussions and activities.

This course is required to fulfill the Minor in Intergroup Relations Education.

 

ALA 170: Special Topics, Social Identity, Social Inequality & Social Media: An Introduction to Intergroup Relations (3 credits)

What are social identities? Why do they matter? How do they impact how we interact across groups, both in person and online?

This introductory course will provide a survey of sociological, social-psychological, and social justice education theory as it relates to social identity and intergroup relations. Race, class, gender, citizenship, and sexual orientation -among other social identity categories- will be explored, as well as corresponding systems of oppression (racism, sexism, homophobia, and transphobia, etc.) How are we socialized to interact across groups? How does that socialization uphold systems of oppression, and how does our participation in social media provide opportunities to engage these systems, and resist them? We will consider Critical Media Literacy as a framework for understanding and evaluating digital resources around social identity and intergroup relations, and evaluate our own and others' use of social media as a tool for liberation.

Intended Audience: first-year students only

Class Format: Hybrid; with synchronous and asynchronous work/class meetings

 

ALA 171: Making the Most of Michigan (1 credit)*

What are you hoping to gain from your time at Michigan? To take advantage of your experience, ALA 171: Making the Most of Michigan, is a 7-week activity-based course designed to help students get involved, meet people, and present themselves professionally to the world at large.

Students in the course:

  • Visit and learn about resources across the university campus
  • Create online portfolios that detail their goals, aspirations, and key experiences and connect them to career networking tools such as LinkedIn, Handshake, and UCAN
  • Explore social identities and build important communication skills across differences
  • Grow as leaders in the diverse Michigan community

Facilitated by upper-level students, this course creates an environment for students to share perspectives and ideas. It is recommended for all students in their first year at U-M. Ultimately, Making the Most of Michigan is making Michigan yours!

Course Requirements: Attend class conducted weekly in-person, complete assignments, and participate in one MPortfolio showcase during the last class session.

Intended Audience: Students in their first year on U of M campus.

 

ALA 220, PSYCH/SOC 218: Foundations of Intergroup Relations (3 credits)*

(Fulfills LSA's Race & Ethnicity requirements)

Spring 2022: In-person

This introductory course will examine the history of various social identity groups in the United States including identities based on race/ethnicity, gender, religion, socio‐economic class, sexual orientation, and ability status. This course will also examine the theory behind how social identity groups form, and how bias develops (prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination). We will also explore how people develop an understanding of their own social identity group membership, how groups are impacted by privilege and power dynamics, and how to develop advocacy for groups to which one does not belong. Students can expect to participate in class through individual and group projects as well as a class discussion. While there will be some lecture, this course is primarily interactive and activity-based. 

Fall 2022 - Sections 1, 3, 4

Intended Audience: For students who can attend during the scheduled class time to participate in class discussions and activities. 

Class Format: Students will be engaging in class discussions and activities and will be expected to attend class during the scheduled meeting times. Accommodations will be made for students with excused absences.

Fall 2022 - Section 2 

Intended Audience: Only open for first-year and second-year students interested in Psychology, Sociology, and related disciplines.

Class Format: Students will be engaging in class discussions and activities and will be expected to attend class during the scheduled meeting times. Accommodations will be made for students with excused absences.

Submit this form to obtain an override for *Section 002 ONLY* ALA 220/ Psych 213/ SOC 218

This course is required to fulfill the Minor in Intergroup Relations Education.

 

ALA 228: Intergroup Conflict and Co-existence: Religion, Ethnicity, and Culture (3 Credits)

(Not offered Winter 2022)

Conflict is an inherent part of human nature, individual relationships and thus society. However, there are important, successful, and often underreported examples of coalition building and coexistence between groups that historically have been in conflict. This course will examine examples of social conflict based on religion, ethnicity and culture. The course will provide an overview of interdisciplinary theories that help to understand the nature of such conflict (gender, social identity, limited resources, psychological, neurological, communication, anthropological, political science, sociological), and will then review current coalition building and coexistence work among various religious, ethnic, and cultural groups. Conflict as a constructive tool for social change will be analyzed, and important examples of peace and coexistence work in higher education, community programs and NGOs will be examined (i.e. Oasis of Peace, Slifka Program, UN Difficult Dialogues, Peace Studies Program, etc.). Experiential activities will enhance learning about intergroup conflict and coexistence work.

Intended Audience: For students who can attend during the scheduled class time to participate in class discussions and activities.

Class Format: All aspects of this course will be fully compatible with remote online learning. This course will be offered synchronously where students are engaging in class discussions and activities. We will rely primarily on zoom for our class meetings. Students will be expected to attend class during the scheduled meeting times. Because of the community nature of this class, a camera is expected. Accommodations will be made for students with excused absences.

 

ALA 270: Special Topics in Intergroup Dialogue (2 credits)

This course is designed to accompany ALA 321: Practicum in Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation, and can only be elected in conjunction with ALA 321. Students who opt to take ALA 270 along with their ALA 321 course will be afforded a deeper dive into applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues.

Course Requirements: This course is designed to accompany ALA 321: Practicum in Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation, and can only be elected in conjunction with ALA 321.

This course is required to fulfill the Minor in Intergroup Relations Education.

 

ALA/SOC 320, PSYCH 310: Training in Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation (2 credits)*

This course is designed to give students a foundation for the effective facilitation of structured multicultural intergroup dialogues as a social justice education tool. It is intended for students who wish to facilitate intergroup dialogues in a future semester. The topics of this course include group facilitation skills and their applications in inclusive, diverse settings; group processes and dynamics involving social power; social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance, and the nature of social oppression.  

Course Requirement: Departmental Permission is required. Please complete the online training applications:

Spring 2022 Application

Fall 2022 Application

Intended Audience: For students who are interested in learning to facilitate intergroup dialogues and plan to take IGR's practicum course in a future semester.

This course is required to fulfill the Facilitator track of the Minor in Intergroup Relations Education.

Class Format

Spring 2022

Required Retreat: 

  • Friday, May 6 from 5:00–7:30 p.m.
  • Saturday, May 7 from 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
  • Sunday, May 8 from 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Class Meetings:

  • Wednesdays, 1:00–3:00 p.m.

Fall 2022

Required Retreat:

  • Friday, September 9
  • Saturday, September 10
  • Sunday, September 11

Class Meetings:
Section 001: Tues./Thurs., 1:00–2:00 p.m. from Sept. 20-Nov. 17
Section 002: Mon./Wed., 11:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. from Sept. 19-Nov. 16

Questions? Email igrcourses@umich.edu

 

ALA/SOC 321, PSYCH 311: Practicum in Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation (3 credits)*

(Fulfills LSA's Race & Ethnicity requirements)

In order to take this course, you need to complete ALA 320: Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation.

This course follows "Training in Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation" and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students will be facilitating a dialogue section that meets on Wednesdays,10:00 a.m.– 12:00 p.m. or 3:00–5:00 p.m. Students participate in weekly seminars and frequent instructor/coach consultations to: 

  • Discuss and prepare work for weekly dialogue sessions 

  • Strengthen facilitators’ own understanding of intergroup relations 

  • Further develop the co-­facilitation relationship and experience 

  • Discuss theory and practice of group observation, conflict intervention, intergroup communication, and community building 

  • Strengthen facilitators’ understanding and participation in liberatory education

  • Continue facilitators’ own personal growth and development in the intergroup dialogue process 

Practicum focuses on helping students develop and improve their skills as intergroup dialogue facilitators and peer social justice educators. This will be done in the context of the belief that facilitation skills can be used throughout life to create positive social change.  Effective facilitators are effective social change agents. Moreover, by debriefing their actual dialogue experiences, facilitators can deepen their own learning about identity, discrimination, privilege, and social justice.  Ultimately, we believe that individuals with strong intergroup dialogue facilitation skills are one of the key pieces in developing a just and equitable society. This course fulfills the LSA Race & Ethnicity Requirement. 

*An additional two credits can be obtained by simultaneously enrolling in ALA 270. 

Class begins with a required in-person weekend retreat. 

  • Fall 2022 - Weekend Retreat

    • Saturday, August 27- Sunday, August 28

Course Requirements: Students must complete ALA 320: Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation in order to take this course. Students must complete the application by going to this link: 

Intended Audience: For students who are facilitating Intergroup Dialogues, and who can attend during the scheduled class time.

This course is required to fulfill the Facilitator track of the Minor in Intergroup Relations Education.

 

ALA 322, SOC/PSYCH 324: Advanced Practicum in Intergroup Relations (1-4 Credits)

This course is for students who are doing advanced applied work in Intergroup Relations. This includes facilitating intergroup dialogues for a second or third time or being workshop facilitators in supervised IGR or social justice education settings. The course combines the experiential facilitation component with the structured integration of intergroup relations theory.

Course Requirements: Students must complete ALA 321: Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues in order to take this course. Students need to complete the application by going to this link: 

Intended Audience: For students who are facilitating Intergroup Dialogues, and who can attend during the scheduled class time.

 

ALA 323: IGR Directed Study (1-4 credits)*

At The Program on Intergroup Relations at the University of Michigan, Independent Study is a planned, highly individualized format, not addressable through any other course. Independent studies are proposed in writing by the student on this standard form, accepted for supervision by an IGR instructor, and approved by the student's IGR academic adviser prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to enroll.

Course Requirements: Students who want to pursue in-depth an area of study in which they have already developed some basic competence may request enrollment in Independent Study by submitting the application. 

ALA 323 Application

Intended Audience: Students in the IGR Program who have completed the Advanced Practicum and want to go to do an independent study. Students must complete the course application to enroll in the class. 

Class Format: Each student will schedule individual times to meet as needed with their instructor.

 

ALA 324: Facilitation for Effective Leadership (3 credits)*

This course prepares students to be facilitative leaders in campus and community organizations throughout their undergraduate years at U-M and beyond. Specifically, this course will focus on self-care and community-care as necessities for effective facilitation. By connecting facilitation to traditions of social justice education and activism, we’ll illuminate methods of care that past and present facilitators employ[ed] to create group cohesion, guide groups through challenging processes, and maintain and support their own wellness, as well as that of the community.  

Specifically, the skills students will gain from this course include an understanding of:

  • Facilitation as a part of the lineage of social justice education; 
  • The impact of social identities on  managing group dynamics that occur within a diverse group;
  • Individual and group value-setting as foundational to effective facilitation;
  • The unique interpersonal skills necessary for effective facilitation, including active & generative listening, asking questions, and receiving and giving feedback;
  • The roles of conflict exploration and empathy in facilitative leadership;
  • Accountability as a resource for individuals and groups seeking to create social change;
  • Boundary setting and the creation of short and long term wellness planning;
  • The link between facilitation, group effectiveness, and learning.

Class Format: This is a highly participatory setting where students will practice facilitation both in and out of class, as well as engage in exercises to develop their facilitation knowledge and skills. Students in all majors and all types of leadership roles will benefit from this course.

This course meets credit requirements for the Campus Communities and Research track of the Minor in Intergroup Relations Education.

 

ALA 329: IGR Research Practicum (2 credits)*

This course provides an overview of research methods used in intergroup relations, with a special focus on intergroup dialogue. Students will examine research using qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods, and will discuss what each method provides in understanding how identities play a role in intergroup relations, how power and privilege are addressed and how group dynamics and processes affect outcomes of intergroup interactions.

Students will develop a research proposal and present at a research symposium.

They will participate in one of the following on-going research projects within IGR to gain experience in:

  • Coding
  • NVivo software for qualitative analysis
  • SPSS software for analyzing survey and interview data
  • Data management
  • Statistical analyses

This course is required for the Campus Communities and Research track of the Minor in Intergroup Relations Education.

 

ALA 429/ PSYCH 411/ SOC 471: Senior Capstone (3 credits)*

Required to fulfill the Minor in Intergroup Relations

By senior year, many students in the Intergroup Relations minor have managed to find places where they can learn about social justice work and engage in it collaboratively on campus. But how does this translate to life beyond campus? How can they translate these commitments to lives of meaning and purpose?

This course supports students as facilitative leaders in campus and community organizations throughout their undergraduate years at U-M and beyond. Specifically, this course will focus on self-care and community-care as necessities for effective facilitation. By connecting facilitation to traditions of social justice education and activism, we’ll illuminate methods of care that past and present facilitators employ[ed] to create group cohesion, guide groups through challenging processes, and maintain and support their own wellness, as well as that of the community.  

Students will gain an understanding of:

  • Facilitation as a part of the lineage of social justice education
  • Self and community care as part of the lineage of social justice education
  • The importance of Individual and group value-identification  to effective facilitation
  • The importance of Individual and group boundary-setting to effective facilitation
  • Accountability as a resource for individuals and groups seeking to create social change

Intended Audience: This course is intended for juniors or seniors who have taken the IGR course sequence, are involved in the Community Action and Social Change minor or who have had other coursework about social change at the University of Michigan.

Class Format: The course meets in person for 1.5 hours twice a week in seminar format. This is a highly participatory setting in which students will engage in exercises to develop their knowledge of social justice concepts and facilitation skills.

 

ALA 471: Leadership and Facilitation in Community Building (3 credits)*

Leadership and Facilitation in Community Building is a course for undergraduates who facilitate a section of ALA 171: Making the Most of Michigan. (ALA 171 sessions meet in-person on Tuesdays 7:00–9:00 p.m.; Wednesdays 1:00–3:00 p.m. and 6:00–8:00 p.m.; and Thursdays 1:00–3:00 p.m. and 5:30–7:30 pm.)

Each ALA 471 class prepares facilitators for the weekly ALA 171 sessions and connects their facilitation experiences to their broader academic goals and campus involvement. Students in ALA 471 will:

  • deepen knowledge of the transition to college, goal setting, social identity development, professional networking tools and electronic portfolios, and communication skills for leadership across differences
  • strengthen group facilitation skills
    • Listening (active and generative)
    • Asking questions that produce discussion and reflection
    • Getting participants to ask each other questions and follow up on ideas
    • Encouraging sharing of experiences and ideas
    • Noticing and managing dynamics
    • Planning and logistics
  • apply learning in facilitating ALA 171 to career, co-curricular, and life-long learning goals
  • undertake a personal professional development project to highlight their facilitation skills

Course Requirements: Create an electronic portfolio

Intended Audience: Students who have or want to gain facilitation skills, or peer mentoring/advising skills

Class Format: This course will be taught synchronously online.

 

ALA 472: Advanced Leadership and Facilitation in Community (3 credits)*

This course will be offered to undergraduates who have previously facilitated ALA 171 “Making the Most of Michigan.” ALA 472 will focus on theories of student identity development and best practices of group facilitation, and role modeling for new ALA 171 facilitators, each of which will assist them in providing effective leadership for ALA 171, student organizations, and teams in their professional careers.

Course Requirements: Add to an electronic portfolio

Class Format: This class will be taught synchronously online.


*Can be counted towards the Patricia Gurin Certificate of Merit in Intergroup Relations award

Register for IGR courses through the LSA Course Guide